HDD player file?

4 replies [Last post]
Arthur.S
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Joined: Jun 2 1999
First request for me for an HD file for a HDD player. I normally supply a Blu-ray for HD. Not sure how to go about pricing it. I'd add that the request comes from a guest that works as an editor for a TV production company (The groom also works for them). Not sure why, but making me a tad nervous! blush
 
Hopefully 'wake up' this forum too!! laugh
sleepytom
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Joined: Sep 15 2000
Re: HDD player file?
I'm truly amazed that weddings still use disks at all. 
 
Pricing structure is obviously different if your not selling a physical product. If you give them a file then they will not pay a silly premium per disk copy so you'll have to price your work more like corporate video. This means you charge a day rate for shooting, a day rate for editing and a rate for producing each differently encoded output file (one of HDD player, one bluray master? one DVD master? one Vimeo version?) 
 
The total cost / income should be about the same as your used to making for selling however many DVDs / Bluray you normally do at a wedding. Assume that the file will be copied and sent round all the guests, charge about the same as you'd expect to make from disk sales and then everyone is a winner. You get your normal wage, the client gets a film in the format they want and is free to share it with whoever they like.  If they want disks as well then charge for the authoring of each type of disk and optionally offer to duplicate / package the disks, do this basically at cost so they understand that it is the work that has the value not each physical disk. 
 
That's pretty much how we have been charging for video production work for a few years now. Models which are based on physical media having some kind of intrinsic value seem to be very outmoded to me. 

You can contact me at http://tombassford.org
People interested in live production might like to check out http://atemuser.com 

Arthur.S
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Joined: Jun 2 1999
Re: HDD player file?
Thanks for the reply Tom (hoooraaay this forum is awake again. smiley ) I've slightly misled you. I've been paid as per normal for the job. That fee includes 4 DVDs. The file for an HDD player is an extra request. (from a guest, not the couple) If I were dealing in corporate work, HDD would be a no brainer, but the big advantage BD/DVD still has is chapter points - unless something has been developed I don't know about? It also looks like a 'finished' job with a menu system plus customised cover and disc. Don't forget, a wedding film is aimed not just at the couple, but also Parents/Grandparents. I recently had a request (turned down) for a copy on VHS!! I use vimeo etc for highlights of the day clips for friends and family. 
DAVE M
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Joined: May 17 1999
Re: HDD player file?
I have had requests for copies on VHS and  basically charge for a DVD plus £10 for the VHS. It may not be an economic rate but I feel that it might help a Grandparent or whatever.
 
I'm talking about gigs where I'm selling DVDs and doing the job as a sales based event, rather than a wedding type event.
 
I'd be interested if anybody does know about a "DVD style" HDD/file delivery system as it's plain that in  years to come, people may not have the kit to replay a DVD and while delivery of a file isn't that hard, a package that resembles a disc based structure with navigation will be needed.
sleepytom1
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Joined: Feb 16 2012
Re: HDD player file?
Before DVD was a widespread format I used to make CD-Rs which had a small self contained website on the cd which would auto-play when inserted into a PC / Mac.  Quicktime / flash media was embedded into the website to enable easy watching for non-computer savvy users. 
 
A similar approach could be used today, a web video player such as JW Player allowing quite complex interactivity with playlists and chapter style markers being fairly simple to implement. 
 
But ultimately the solution has to be online delivery, maybe selling wedding videos via itunes will be a possibility one day? Such a system would seem to be the logical way forward to distribute content to users of a wide range of devices.
Another option that will soon make sense would be an iOS / Android app where a login sold to the client would allow downloading and viewing of their film.