enhancing the feel-good wedding

12 replies [Last post]
tom hardwick
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Joined: Apr 8 1999

The wedding edit:
I notice that cuts are best made at the peak of
the smile, that way running the film gives the subliminal impression that the day was totally happy. It's tempting to let a face stay longer on screen if it's sharp (and pretty), but I try to keep myself following this self imposed rule. I've also become less fearful of jumpcuts, and it can be used to good effect at times. To work it has to be shown to be intentional; ie there must be 3 or 4 following each other.

tom.

Chrome
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Joined: May 26 1999

Great piece of advice Tom, thanks mate! I'm going to try that.

JMCP
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Joined: Nov 21 2000

Hi,

can someone please explain to me what is meant by "jumpcut". Thanks.

Cheers John

Barry Hunter
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Joined: Nov 30 2001

A similar shot following a previous one!

Some jumps are acceptable, i.e. you have a general shot of something happening with a guy speaking, next, a close-up of the same guy continuing the dialogue.

To me an un-acceptable JC would be the first shot followed by a very similar shot even if the dialogue continued.

Does this help? not an easy thing to explain.

Barry Hunter videos4all.org

mooblie
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Joined: Apr 27 2001

A cut between two shots with only a small change in framing or angle of the same subject - or worse - a static background, where people suddenly move into, out of or around the fixed background.

OKOK, I can't explain it very well either...

Martin - DVdoctor in moderation. Everyone is entitled to my opinion.

Joel Salindong
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Joined: Aug 13 2004

Greetings!

Any tips and tricks in shooting and editing to enhance the look of wedding videos? For example, how to achieve a "dreamy effect" sequence or a film-like wedding video using a DV camera.

Thanks!

Barry Hunter
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Joined: Nov 30 2001

Explaining JumpCuts is nearly as difficult as explaining "Crossing the line"! now it`s someone else`s turn to do that :rolleyes:

Barry Hunter videos4all.org

harlequin
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Joined: Aug 16 2000

have a look here for some definitions

http://www.aber.ac.uk/media/Documents/short/gramtv.html

my way of looking at the term 'crossing the line' :

Reversing the action (direction of travel or eyeline) in successive shots. This confuses the viewer's sense of direction.

i.e. camera angle changes by more than 180 degrees and therefore causes false impressions of which angle the person/object etc really is positioned at relative to the last shot.

you should stay between 1 and 179 degrees to keep the 'logic' correct.

Gary MacKenzie

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northernimage
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Joined: Apr 18 2004

Imagine watching a football match on TV, a goal is scored but the action replay is shown from a camera on the opposite side of the pitch - now it looks like the teams are kicking the opposite way! That's "crossing the line".

JMCP
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Joined: Nov 21 2000

Hi,

thanks for the education, think I understand now.

Cheers John

DSR
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Joined: Aug 2 2004

Interesting - the definition I was taught for "jumpcut" was where you cut from a shot of the bride on her own to one where she's standing next to the groom, without either a shot of something else in between or showing him walking into shot. Basic continuity really.

keepitsimple
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Joined: Aug 19 2004

Greetings all.

It's something that bothers me - where as a jump cut is two similar looking adjoining shots, continity is another. In a highlights sequence for instance you can move along quickly and I sometimes wonder whether I should mix between shots, or follow the "comic strip" cutting theory - this happened, then this, then that.

Ho hum

Mahesh
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Joined: Jan 17 2002
Quote:
Originally posted by keepitsimple:
Greetings all.

It's something that bothers me - where as a jump cut is two similar looking adjoining shots, continity is another. In a highlights sequence for instance you can move along quickly and I sometimes wonder whether I should mix between shots, or follow the "comic strip" cutting theory - this happened, then this, then that.

Ho hum

Look at it. If it looks wrong then it is.
If the brain accepts it as a continuous thread, then it is okay. Look at most of pop videos. They are ful of jump cuts - but they are scripted and look good.

Regards Mahesh crestvideo.co.uk