Card reader made SSD into H:

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RayL
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Joined: Mar 31 1999
An interesting oddity that may help someone in the future.
 
The starting point was to build a quick, cheap computer for the office. I already had an old case, one of those 'powered stereo loudspeakers' that fits into a 5.25 slot, a mouse, a keyboard and a monitor.
 
To build the computer I needed:
Motherboard with CPU and cooler
Power supply
60Gb Solid State Drive
DVD re-writer
Front panel card reader / USB port unit
 
The above bits came from Maplin for £220 (free delivery) and it didn't take long to fit them in the box. Installation of XP followed (I told you this was a cheap computer) and the oddity appeared - the SSD boot drive was set up by Windows as H:
 
Why not C: as is usual?
 
Than I twigged. The four card reader slots had been set up as C:, D:, E: and F:, with the DVD drive as G: . If I had used a mechanical boot drive this wouldn't have happened but I suppose XP  reacted this way because it was an SSD.
 
There was a particular reason (see later) why I wanted the SSD to be C: so I had to unplug the card reader from the motherboard, format the SSD and start again. This time the SSD correctly became C: and I could then reconnect the card reader.
 
Why did it have to be C: ? Legacy programs. As an example, one of my essential office utilities is Labels Unlimited from the early 1990s. This little gem will do what most label programs will not - print one label anywhere on a sheet - a real money-saver. I've got 20 years of customers names and addresses all ready to print at a moments notice and I wouldn't fancy the task of transcribing the whole bloomin' lot into a newer, different, program.
 
Although programs of that vintage often won't install from the original floppies when using XP , I've discovered that they can simply be cut and pasted into the new drive and will work as normal. The drive has to be C: because that was the drive letter on the computer that they came from. The same is true, for example, of Microsoft's Word 2. I won't bother you with the reasons why I sometimes use Word 2 but its another little gem.
 
Ray
 
 
 
 
 
 
col lamb
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Joined: Jan 2 2010
Re: Card reader made SSD into H:
Usualy within the BIOS you can set a specific drive to be the primary boot
 
You can then set another drive for second boot preference etc
 
My ASUS mobo certainly allows this function and all other mobo's I have used to built systems over the last few years have also allowed selective boot
 
So for others in the same situation as Ray rather than stripping components out and reformatting, check in the BIOS
 
 

Col Lamb Lancashire UK ASUS P6X58D-E MOBO, 3.3GHz hex core i7 CPU, 12GB RAM, nVidia GTX580 GPU, W7 64bit, 500Gb boot, 1Tb RAID (Mirror) Store, 500Gb RAID (stripped), Edius 6.05, CS 5.5

RayL
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Joined: Mar 31 1999
Re: Card reader made SSD into H:
Ah, then here's another interesting point.  I'd initially set the BIOS for the DVD drive to be the primary boot (because of loading XP from disk) and the SSD as no.2 ( I reverse them when XP is loaded). Nevertheless, it set the SSD as H:
 
Ray
 
Mark M
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Joined: Nov 17 1999
Re: Card reader made SSD into H:
There are also "under the hood" tweaks that you can do to reassign drive letters. You can google for how to do it. So no, reformat and reinstall probably wasn't necessary, OTOH, I imagine it didn't take long with an SSD.

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RayL
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Joined: Mar 31 1999
Re: Card reader made SSD into H:
Mark,
 
Agreed that Control Panel/Administrative Tools/Computer Management offers a way to reassign drive letters, and I use this often when swapping data drives. However, swapping the boot drive letter after installation (even if Windows allowed it), would render the drive unbootable because all its drive references would be wrong.
 
But you're right, with an SSD the software loading time is greatly reduced.