35 MM FILM SCANNER WANTED

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asmair
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Joined: Feb 5 2001

I am wishing to buy a scanner for 35mm film, slides and negatives. It must be capable of scanning either and must be able to convert the colour negative to a positive. I also work with black and white 35mm, which it must also handle. Any recommendations please.

mooblie
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Joined: Apr 27 2001

What sort of budget do you have in mind, asmair?

What sort of use are you going to make of the final result?

Final output on the web demands very much less of a scanner than final printed output. Bringing stills into video probably needs somewhere between the two.

Martin - DVdoctor in moderation. Everyone is entitled to my opinion.

Fergie
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Joined: Jan 9 2001

I use an Epson 1260 which can scan both negatives and colour slides. It's about a year old so will have been superceded by newer models. Price when new was about £70.

Hope this info helps.

               
                  Fergie
There's only one eF in Ferguson

I now seem to spend a lot of time arguing with inanimate objects

harlequin
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i use an epson 2400 photo to scan negs/slides etc.

Gary MacKenzie

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mooblie
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Key question to ask asmair: resolution?

Rough guide: 1200dpi=low, 2400dpi=medium, and 4800dpi=high in this area.

Martin - DVdoctor in moderation. Everyone is entitled to my opinion.

asmair
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Joined: Feb 5 2001

The scanner is to archive the thousands of colour/b&w negatives and slides. Also I am doing a further education photographic course with a view to perhaps pursuing a career in photography, so I would prefer to prepare for the future rather than having to upgrade along the road.

Thanks for the info.

PaulD
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Joined: Aug 31 2002

Hi
I've found the best to be the Nikon Coolscan range, allowing scanning up to the grain-limit of resolution, and with anti-scratch/dust software:
http://www.europe-nikon.com/category.aspx?countryid=20&languageid=22&catId=97

John Lawton
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Joined: Jun 23 2002

Hi PaulD,
I use a Nikon Coolscan IV ED and although it's at the lower end of Nikon's scanner range I can recommended it.

Regards
John

Shakey
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Joined: Jan 25 2001

Asmair

One of the problems with archiving pictures now, is that as resolution gets better you will probably want to rescan in the future! I started with a Minolta Dimage Dual Scan III (2800 dpi). I have now upgraded to a Minolta 5400 (5400 dpi). Both are excellent. With the 5400 I have had pictures used by the BBC on screen (this is pretty low res), pictures used in a book and two magazines. So it would be fine for pro work. I would suggest you go for something at least 4000 dpi. Either Minolta/Nikon/Canon all of these companies make excellent scanners, with not too many differences between them. What is important is your scanning technique.... find a good book!

If you have any other questions please do not hesitate to ask. Pictures from my latest project scanned with a Minolta 5400 can be found at http://www.strike84.co.uk

Hope this helps

Martin